SYDNEY OPERA HOUSE

SYDNEY OPERA HOUSE

Although there are literally thousands of images of this architectural icon, the Sydney Opera House ultimately proved irresistible — I had to create my own! The finished piece evolved from multiple layers of fractals and color, all sandwiched together digitally to form the finished work you see here. I am forever trying to convey how marvelously detailed fractals are. Low-res images simply don’t get it across. Here’s an idea: video! I can bring sections of the art very close and skim along the surface. Cool, yes? As always, beautiful reproductions are available for your home, office, family and friends on museum-quality fine art paper and stretched canvas, framed or unframed. Click here to...
MAPLE TWIST

MAPLE TWIST

When it comes to creating art, I’m managing to stay productive. I completed MAPLE TWIST this past weekend and couldn’t wait to plug it into the blog. Once again, I worked extensively with various grayscale versions of this piece throughout its creation, and I have included the final grayscale for you here. When working with fractals, it is easy to get pulled off track and hypnotized by the copious detail, especially when applying the final colors and textures. I find that frequently referring to the grayscale image helps keep me focused on the overall impact and composition. I am especially pleased with how the greens fade to deep purples in the upper center of the piece, and how the maple-colored background supports the orangy-golds. As shown — Finished size: 43.5″ x 30.0″ Print on Somerset Velvet Fine Art: 32.0″ x 18.0″ Frame: Distressed Black with Gold Bead, 2″ width Top Mat: Digital White, Width: Top 3.5″, Bottom 4″, Sides 3.5″ Bottom Mat: Cranberry Glazing: Non-glare Acrylic Normally ships in 6-8 business days MAPLE TWIST is available for purchase (in a variety of sizes and substrates) as of this moment. You may contact me directly to answer questions or assist you with your order, or click here to order...
EDGE OF EDEN

EDGE OF EDEN

I plucked this beautiful sprig of leaves from a bush in my backyard. I wish I could tell you the name of the plant. However, when inspiration strikes I am only concerned with making art. From a botany point of view, I only know it’s hearty enough to withstand winter nights in Sedona. I brought the sprig into my studio and made a high resolution scan. Very nice. From there I adjusted saturation and contrast, then selectively embellished the image with drips and drabs of color. I made a digital collage for the background, parts of which include a rusted metal plate for texture. The detail is superb. It’s nice to get back to nature every once in a while. Art, as they say, is all around us. As shown — Finished size: 46.3″ x 39.0″ Print on Somerset Velvet Fine Art: 32.0″ x 24.0″ Frame: 3 3/8 in. Black/Gold Scoop Top Mat: Matte White, Width: Top 3.5″, Bottom 4.25″, Sides 3.5″ Bottom Mat: Matte White Glazing: Non-glare Acrylic Normally ships in 6-8 business days EDGE OF EDEN is available for purchase (in a variety of sizes and substrates) as of this moment. You may contact me directly to answer questions or assist you with your order, or click here to order...
Sedona Valentine (1 and 2)

Sedona Valentine (1 and 2)

I must be in my RED period; I couldn’t get enough red when working on these two ethereal pieces. That, and Valentine’s Day is right around the corner. For all you lovers. Hmmm. Is framed art more impressive than a card? Oh my yes! It’s fun to be up to your elbows in the art, isn’t it? Once I’m past the conceptual stages and it feels like things are going to work out, it’s exciting to push and pull the boundaries, work on detail and play with color. That I was able to produce two pieces from this concept is double-good. Once again, the marvelous detail achievable with fractals (shown above) astounds me. It is beauty within beauty; I never tire of the infinite permutations. The texture, which is generally lost at web sizes, is tasty at close range. Sedona Valentine 1, and, Sedona Valentine 2, as shown — Finished size (each): 29.5″ x 44.3″ Print on Somerset Velvet Fine Art: 18.0″ x 32.0″ Frames: Metropolitan Black with Gold, 2″ width Top Mat: Fairfield White, Width: Top 3.5″, Bottom 4.25″, Sides 3.5″ Bottom Mat: Digital White Glazing: Non-glare Acrylic Both VALENTINE pieces are available for purchase now. You may contact me directly to answer questions or assist you with your order, or click here to order...
THE JUPITER EXPEDITION — A Study in Tonal Harmony

THE JUPITER EXPEDITION — A Study in Tonal Harmony

I generally keep my work color-neutral until the final stages, preferring to concentrate on concept, composition, design, and focal point before developing a color palette. This insures that the work has a solid tonal foundation which isn’t lost when color is applied. Simply stated, tonal harmony is “a pleasing pattern in the balance between light and dark.” Before I introduce my latest work, THE JUPITER EXPEDITION, I’d like to point out a technique you may find useful when evaluating the tones in your own art: Convert to grayscale. Before you send your paintings, photographs or digital creations into the world, look at them in grayscale. Does the work hold up in a pleasing way, or is color being used to disguise tonal deficiencies? Some art is intended to be low-contrast, but if your work can benefit from balanced tonal separation and tonal harmony, there is no quicker way to identify areas of weakness than with grayscale. Now, on to the new art! I like lost civilizations, ancient tombs and daring expeditions. But…can those themes — and especially those feelings — be conveyed in abstract works of art? I think so, and with a fair amount of drama and imagination. THE JUPITER EXPEDITION was very exciting to work on, from the first tentative anchor shapes to the tattered edges and bleeding tones, to the final explosion of crimson and gold. For me, it is a remarkably satisfying piece. I hope it is for you, too. As shown — Finished size: 46.0″ x 32.8″ Print on Somerset Velvet Fine Art: 32.0″ x 18.0″ Frame: Wide Bronze Scoop, 3.5″ width Top Mat:...
What’s In A Name?

What’s In A Name?

Titles are not just a way to catalog art, but an important signpost which connects artists to their audience. Thoughtful naming allows/suggests a path for viewers to more fully experience the art’s meaning and it’s overall effect. For me, naming a new piece of art can sometimes take longer than creating it in the first place. That’s how important names are. Certainly, there is the other side of the coin. Over the years I’ve had discussions with artists who refuse to name their work beyond “Untitled”. They say “I don’t want to influence what the viewer sees in them.” I understand their logic, especially with regard to abstract pieces. However, I’m not willing to divorce myself from my work to that degree. Not anymore, anyway. Naming the art gives that art it’s soul. Now it’s ready; now it’s complete. And there’s no getting around it — the title gives my patrons and viewers an important connection to me, the artist. It is additional insight into my mood, my process, my emotions and my moment. I have often thought that a piece’s title should pop into my head when I’m doing the work, or at least during the last hours of completion. But no. Whichever part of my brain is responsible for naming things is completely shut off when I’m creating art. That turns out to be a good thing. Once finished with the visual, I can then look at the work with a slightly different set of eyes — less creative art lust and more contemplative afterglow. Ha! Perhaps at times I seek to balance an over-zealous image by...